22 thoughts on “A Fulfilling New Years Resolution: Retirement Planning

  1. my name is cynthia s wiersema I have been on disability social security since 2000 for health reasons now in a wheel chair I will be 65 in may of 2018 what do I do to get on medicare? I am already on part A my husband is still working and have some health insurance will I still get my monthly check? dont know what to do or at what age to start I need to get part B and D can you help me?

    • Before you turn 65 you will be get so many things from Medicare , they will inform you the cost of B and D and walk you through the entire process. Yes you will still get your monthly check in the amount you are receiving today.

      • Medicare has nothing to do with Part B enrollments. They are done through Social Security. If you are on social security disability, then you already had an enrollment period and turned Part B down due to your spouse’s employer plan which is primary. You will be automatically enrolled in Part B without penalty again at age 65 (it will be done 3 months in advance). If you no longer have the employer plan, you should consider enrolling in Part B up to 3 months before your spouse stops working so it is in place effective the month he stops rather than waiting until age 65. When he stops working the employer plan by law is secondary and may only pay up to 20% of your bills since you should then have signed up for Part B already. This is called a special enrollment period or SEP. If he will still be working after age 65, you may turn down Part B again. Reminder: when he stops working Part B will become primary. Medicare allows SSA to again process a future enrollment up to 3 months in advance. If you enroll after the work stops, the SEP will go for 7 more months but Part B can only begin the month after your delayed enrollment. Plan ahead! With an expected hiring freeze, delays in processing may ensue, depending on your local office’s staffing losses. So don’t wait until the last minute.

  2. Social Security matters but last two years left me way behind the cost of living curve. I received a measly 2% raise and then a minuscule 0.2% raise. Then Medicare took it all away with their latest premium increase. This is a shameful way to treat anyone let alone one who has given Social Security my hard earned money for 51 years.

      • Don’t shoot the messenger. The people you elect to the House and the Senate determine all the rules and formulas. If you keep electing them after what has happened to you, you have no reason to expect a sudden epiphany on their part. Your votes have consequences so hold federal elected officials accountable. Telling SSA you are unhappy will not accomplish a thing since COLA and premium policy is not made by the agency.

  3. I agree with you Gary, it is a scam, and criminal, the way retirees are treated by the deadbeats in Washington.
    Why is the CPI for SSA benefits not figured on goods and services that retired folks actually buy? That would give more clear picture of real income. But when the increase in Medicare is based on factors that do not parallel the CPI measure, you are watching your spending power shrink. It then becomes more difficult to make ends meet.
    Hopefully we are going to see big changes with President Trump. He will get rid of the corruption and wasteful spending and concentrate on getting the payments in SSA to those that need it most.

    • Couldn’t have said it any better Gary. When are these dunderheads in Washington going to realize this. COLA increases should be based on necessities that go up every year. As you stated, Medicare just increased, utilities did–why can’t the COLA be adjusted to fit these very real increases?

      • The last time you got a good increase was when a Republican was President. Give the new President a chance before complaining. Social Security was not meant to be one’s complete retirement, however it has now become that for most people. You have people making minimum wage and paying half of their salary for insurance coverage due to Obama Care. The cost required to pay for Medicare coverage is very minimal compared to some companies. First we have to stop supplying free care for illegals and get back on the track of America being Great.

  4. How can one confidently plan for a secure retirement when Congress keeps threatening to cut our Social Security benefits? They are causing a lot of anxiety for me and a lot of others near retirement.

    • Hello Frank. Currently, there have been no changes to the Social Security programs. According to the Social Security Board of Trustees, the combined assets of the Social Security trust funds are projected to be depleted in 2034. If Congress does not act before then, there will only be sufficient income coming in to pay 79 percent of scheduled benefits. For more information, please visit https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/TR/2016/index.html. Thanks!

  5. I am 100% disabled and have been receiving SS disability
    payments since 2000. I am confined to my home now. I am 62 1/2 now and would like to know what men’s retirement age is. Is it 65? Will my disability payments change at retirement or will I receive regular SS retirement payments instead of disability payments?

    • retirement age depends on the YEAR you were born; not your sex.

      when i turned “retirement age”, my ssdi payments REMAINED $$ 😉

      skimmed this new plan; could not see where you came up with average 2.5% interest ?? that fluctuates.

      please advise how/where this came to be. thanks!

    • You will get the same except it’ll be now called social security. You are getting the maximum because you are disable and that’s it unless we get another .003 COLA raise next year.

    • Thanks for your question, David. Currently, full retirement age is 66. If you are referring to SSDI (Disability benefits) converting to Retirement benefits, you do not need to apply. When you reach your full retirement age, we will automatically convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits, but the amount remains the same. We hope this helps!

  6. We all need to ask our House representatives to redefine the COLA to include medical costs. This year’s two increases prove the point, with the Medicare increase vastly higher than the COLA.

  7. When a couple receives two checks each month what happens when one is deceased? Does the one left received only one check.

    • Generally, your Social Security benefits will be consolidated in one check. If you’re getting Social Security benefits based on your own work, we will check to see if you can get more money as a widow or widower. If so, you’ll get a combination of benefits that equals the higher amount. If you’re getting benefits as a wife or husband based on your spouse’s work, we’ll change your payments to survivor’s benefits when you report the death to us. Visit our Survivors Planner for more information.

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