Does It Sound Too Good To Be True?

Have you heard the expression, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”?  That is a good rule of thumb to spot a scam. Educating yourself is the best defense against fraud, identity theft, and scams. National Consumer Protection Week, sponsored by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), takes place March 5 to11, 2017. It’s the perfect time to learn about and share ways to make informed choices and protect yourself. To learn more or to get involved, visit the FTC website. Continue reading

facebooktwitterlinkedin

Don’t Let Scammers Prey on Your Generosity

natural disastersNatural disasters bring out the best in people. The ever-present generosity of Americans is front and center right now, as we try to help the victims of the Louisiana flood. Millions have given their time and donated to the relief funds and charities.

Unfortunately, times like these also bring out people looking to profit from others’ misfortune. For example, by creating fake charities and devising other ways to take advantage of donors. Continue reading

facebooktwitterlinkedin

Don’t Be a Scam Victim—You’re in Control

IRSWith the tax season wrapping up, scammers are out in full force. Perhaps you received a phone call demanding payment from the IRS. They may threaten you with legal action if you do not pay immediately, or say things like, “we are sending the police to arrest you.” While these calls may seem scary, it is important to understand that they are not legitimate. This scam, which started in October 2013, has claimed over $29 million from its victims. Unfortunately, this is just one of many scams designed to make you believe you are speaking with a legitimate government official. Continue reading

facebooktwitterlinkedin

Disability Application Scammers

Graphic of a computer screen with ones and zeros on the screen and the word identity.The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is alerting people about the dangers of identity theft, specifically in instances where people have started an application for disability benefits. Scammers try to get personal information from applicants by pretending to help complete applications. For example, these scammers may ask you to give, or confirm, your Social Security number or bank account numbers.

Don’t become an identity theft or phishing victim. You can read the FTC’s advice on how to protect yourself while applying for benefits here.

facebooktwitterlinkedin

Don’t Stand by … Speak Up!

A concerned woman on the phoneAugust is National Bystander Awareness Month. As a bystander, you can play an essential role in preventing violence, wrongdoings, and fraud. Have you ever witnessed something that you knew was wrong and wondered if you should report it? Did you want to say something, but didn’t because you were afraid of negative consequences? Don’t be afraid, because there are federal laws to protect you. Continue reading

facebooktwitterlinkedin

Social Security Takes Fraud Seriously

An identity thief holds a Social Security card in front of a keyboardOne out of five Americans receives benefits from Social Security, including elderly retirees, people with severe illnesses, and widows and children of deceased wage earners.

With so many of our country’s most vulnerable citizens depending on us, we take our responsibility of providing them with a measure of financial security seriously.

Continue reading

facebooktwitterlinkedin