Make Your Future a Good One with the Retirement Estimator

photograph of a couple looking at the blueprint of a house, planning for their future.If the alternate 2015 of the Back to the Future film series were accurate, we’d be easing along on hover boards, navigating skyways in flying cars, and enjoying the luxuries of self-lacing sneakers and self-fitting jackets.

In 1985, after making it back to the future from 1955, Marty joined Doc for a drive 30 years into the future. That future is now.

In that imagined 2015, we conduct business by fax and watch multiple channels of entertainment on the wall.

In some ways, the real 2015 is far more advanced than the imagined one of the movies. You don’t see any computers or online services in the movie — let alone the computers most of us carry around with us in the form of smartphones and tablets.

In the real 2015, you can do a far better job of predicting your own future. Just visit the Retirement Estimator. With the Retirement Estimator, you can plug in some basic information to get an instant, personalized estimate of your future benefits. Different choices in life can alter the course of your future, so try out different scenarios such as higher and lower future earnings amounts and various retirement dates to get a good prediction of how it can change your future benefit amounts.

As Doc said in the final moments of the film series, no one’s future has been written yet. “Your future is what you make it. So make it a good one.”

With the information you get from the Retirement Estimator, you’ll have a better idea of what types of savings and pensions you may need, and at what age you should consider retiring — to make your future the best it can be.

You don’t need a converted DeLorean or flux capacitor or even a team of creative filmmakers to predict your future. Just visit the Retirement Estimator and predict your own!

And, when you’re ready to put that future in motion, apply for benefits online.

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26 thoughts on “Make Your Future a Good One with the Retirement Estimator

  1. A friend of ours , whose husband died three weeks ago, asked a questions about what to expect from social security benefits.
    Can anyone give me an answer?
    Thanks for your help.
    Benny B.

  2. I was married to my ex husband for 25 yrs. I was told that I can collect through my ex husband social security instead if mine. Since I am collecting that they made me collect on myself .why I found out is the statement they send was an amount then plus 30. From my ex. I am totally confused . Can somebody help me out on this pls. So confused. And thank you for everyone’s help.

    • The earliest age to apply and receive Social Security Retirement Benefits is 62, but if you decide to get benefits before your full retirement age, your benefits will be reduced. At age 64 and if you are ready, you can complete your application for retirement benefits online. Also, you can create a My Social Security account to review your earnings record and get an estimate of your future benefits. If you have specific questions, you can call our toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) for assistance. Representatives are available between 7a.m. and 7p.m., Monday through Friday. You will generally have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week.

  3. Happy Holidays everybody, and special to the our Acting Commissioner of Social Security, its specialist, and workers in general.
    God bless America!
    God bless Social Security!

    Thanks.

    • Hi Mildred, we are sorry to hear that you are having difficulty reaching someone by phone. We are experiencing higher than normal call volume. When calling our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, is generally best if you call later in the week. Our representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. We also respond to questions and provide general information through our Blog and Facebook page. If you have a general question, we encourage you to ask here. But remember, never post personal information on social media. Thanks!

  4. My father recently started receiving Social Security. He calculated that he would have to live to 150 years old just to get back what the benevolent government has taken. And if he could have invested that money with average returns he would have over 2million to retire on. I do not see how SS is considered anything but a crime against humanity.

    • I am in agreement, they have told me so many different lies and most of all when I turned 65 and had a better insurance policy with a good subsidy…I was told it was mandatory that I join or SS would cut off my check and make me pay back all the money they had paid me. I asked what would happen to the money I paid and was told I would just lose it. I did not know we lived in a Communist country where we did not have freedom of choice. In addition to that I had been told that when I turned 66 I could make any amount of money without being penalized. I recently received a letter stating that I could only make up to a certain amount, not even $50,000. Sound like I am being told what to do by the government, isn’t this Communism.
      I always thought that the US government was for the people, especially the less fortunate people, I know better now,

  5. I have always wanted and still want to know what happened to my Social Security contributions during my 25 years of working. I collect my late husband’s Social Security. I was told you can only collect the higher Social Security. WHY? WHAT HAPPENED TO MY SOCIAL SECURITY CONTRIBUTIONS FOR MY 25 YEARS OF WORKING???????

  6. It’s very difficult to get my prescription drug. They price IS extremely high. NO, Medicare will NOT pay for it because it’s not in their formally. I have Migraines every day, sometimes Chronic. I NEED help please!

    • Please reply to this message above. I’m on Social Security for 25 years with NO help at all it’s all out of the pocket.

      • Hi Carolyn, you may want to check and see if you are eligible to receive social services from the state in which you live. These services include Medicaid, which may help pay for medication that Medicare does not cover. You can get information about services in your area from your local social services office. Or you can visit the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) web page for more information. We hope this information helps.

  7. I am a Veteran rated 100% total and permanently disabled per the VA. 70% of this is PTSD due to MST. I have partial paralysis in both knees, severe back pain, migraine headaches, insomnia, anxiety (panic attacks) , severe depression. I also have High Blood Pressure, DMII ( I take two pills and two different insulin meds per day). I take Percocet 4 times per day for pain. I am unable to concentrate and my memory is failing. I was denied for SSDI in VA, I had a hearing and now my paperwork is at Falls Church VA and continues to be pending since Nov 2014- I applied in Dec 2012. I stopped working due to my disabilities in July 2011. I was denied stating I could work for an office assistant as an assistant. I was previously in the military for 9.5 years and an LPN for the past years up until 2011. I informed SSA that I am 100% T/P disabled , but it appears that my paperwork has not been expedited, in fact at one point I was told it was lost and had to resend it. I am so tired and I don’t feel like fighting anymore, I just want an answer-hopefully an approved award because it is sad to treat people like this when they get ill although I have qualified per your regulations.

  8. and the lives of your family members. This is not a book of advice, this is a book of action. With the tools and methods you will learn to use, you will learn how to anticipate the future, and how to change the course of your life.

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