33 thoughts on “Prepare for Your Future with my Social Security and myRA

  1. My sister collects Social Security from her husband. Does the “D” after his SS number stand for deceased or dependent?

    • A letter after a Social Security number is an identifying suffix called the “Beneficiary Identification Code”. A letter “D” in this case, identifies a “Wife receiving benefits on a deceased husband’s record”.

    • Hi Linda, we have an official social media team dedicated to posting messages and responses to customer inquiries or comments that specifically address SSA issues. Please be aware that our official agency responses will always include the Social Security Administration (SSA) seal. Our blog — Social Security Matters — gives readers information about a variety of topics, including our programs, online services, current events, and human-interest stories, usually in greater detail than typically shared on our other social media platforms. Thank you for your support and for using our blog.

      • Laurie,We did connect small groups for single adults at the SG Connection last Thursday. The Converge event is for single adults (men and women) to come together for a day of serving the community and fellowship. If you want more information about it, check out the website corccrge.portcityehunvh.orgLet me know if you have any additional questions.Thanks!

    • Hi Linda, we have an official social media team committed to responding to customer inquiries and sharing important Social Security messages. Our official agency responses will always include the Social Security Administration (SSA) seal. Our blog — Social Security Matters — gives readers information about a variety of topics, including our programs, online services, current events, and human-interest stories, usually in greater detail than typically shared on our other social media platforms. Thank you for your support and for using our blog.

  2. I would like to know if my x retires at 62 and he is collecting, and I am on disability just turned 60 am I allowed anything from his account Social Security?

    • Hello Jan, you may be able to receive benefits on your ex-spouse’s record at age 62 if:
      • You were married to your ex-spouse for at least 10 years;
      • You are unmarried;
      • Your ex-spouse is entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits and,
      • The benefit you are entitled to receive based on your own work is less than the benefit you would receive based on your ex-spouse’s work.
      For more information, please visit our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced. Thanks!

    • Hello Jan, you may be able to receive benefits on your ex-spouse’s record at age 62 if:
      • You were married to your ex-spouse for at least 10 years;
      • You are unmarried;
      • Your ex-spouse is entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits and,
      • The benefit you are entitled to receive based on your own work is less than the benefit you would receive based on your ex-spouse’s work.
      For more information, please visit our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced. Thanks!

  3. I plan on retiring soon, how soon do i need to notify SSA. I am currently receiving spousal benefits and plan to retire May 1, 2016 I believe.

    • Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance. Remember that Social Security benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of May, you will receive your first benefit payment in June. If you cannot apply online or you decide not to finish applying online, for whatever reason, you can apply in person at any Social Security office or by calling our toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. Representatives are available between 7a.m. and 7p.m., Monday through Friday. Generally, you’ll have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Happy retirement!

  4. I am glad I am getting my benefits and just don’t understand how the poor have it better off than most of us that have worked most of our lives. While I was working my neighbor was home and never worked, and his family had everything some of us never had while working. That’s what happens when women don’t get married and we have to support the ( male ) baby maker, and his children.

  5. I’m retire receiving soc. Security .
    Can I make a larger payment from my savings to ensure a better retirement, like buying anther pension payment?

    • Thank you for your question Jj. Individuals qualify for Social Security benefits by earning Social Security credits when they work in a job and pay Social Security taxes. The amount of the retirement benefits you receive is established at the time you applied for retirement benefits. It is based on the amount of your average lifetime earnings and your age at the time you applied. Generally, we use the highest years of earnings to calculate your monthly benefit amount.

  6. I just heard that it’s possible to not only receive my deceased husbands social security benefits ( which I do) but also my own at the same time. Is this true?

    • Hi Sue, sometimes, a person could be entitled to more than one benefit at the same time and may receive a combination of benefits equaling a higher amount. For example, a person may be entitled as a retired worker on his/her own record and also as a spouse or widow on another record. However, this individual’s benefit amount can never exceed the highest of either benefit amount to which they are entitled to. To see if you qualify for a higher benefit than what you are currently receiving, contact your local office or you may call our toll free telephone number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and ask a representative to assist you.

  7. My wife is nearing 62 and has some social security benefits but less than 1/2 my benefits. My question is, can she claim social security benefits at 62 based on her earning record and then switch to spousal benefits at 67 when I claim? Will she get reduced spousal benefits if she does this?

    • Hi Alan. If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Your wife may still be eligible to collect reduced benefits on your record when you apply. Remember, if someone is eligible for both, his or her own benefit and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay their own first. If their spousal benefits are higher than their own retirement benefits, he or she will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For Your Spouse for more information.

  8. I would like to apply for a new social security card as I would like to change my name on the card as I have divorced and I would like to change to my name to my child’s father’s name. Can you help me please.. Thank you

  9. The most important preparation for a mission is spiritual. But parents can help their children develop practical skills as well.

  10. I would like to know if my x retires at 62 and he is collecting, and I am on disability just turned 60 am I allowed anything from his account Social Security?

    • Hello Stacey, you may be able to receive benefits on your ex-spouse’s record at age 62 if:
      • You were married to your ex-spouse for at least 10 years;
      • You are unmarried;
      • Your ex-spouse is entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits and,
      • The benefit you are entitled to receive based on your own work is less than the benefit you would receive based on your ex-spouse’s work.
      For more information, please visit our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced. Thanks!

  11. I am 63 and am considering filing for ssc. If I keep working how much income am I allowed to make without a penalty.

    • Good question Perry. If you are under full retirement age the earnings limit for 2016 is $15,720. We deduct $1 from your benefit payments for every $2 you earn above the annual limit. To learn more, please visit our Frequently Asked Questions web page or read our publication: “How Work Affects Your Benefits”. When you are ready, you can complete the online application in as little as 15 minutes. Also, you can create a My Social Security account to review your earnings record and get an estimate of your future benefits. If you have specific questions, you can call our toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) for assistance. Representatives are available between 7a.m. and 7p.m., Monday through Friday. Generally, you’ll have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Happy planning!

  12. I receive both SSI and Social Security benefits. If I open a myRA account, would it count against my $2,000 resource limit? Do my current benefits count against my $2,000 resource limit? Would it be better to apply for the ABLE account in the Fall of 2017?

    • Thank you for your question John. myRA account is a savings program, for people looking for a way to start saving for retirement. Keep in mind that the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is a needs-based program, and the amount of SSI benefits is based, in part, on the income and resources available to the individual. A resource is money as well as something that you own and can turn into cash. Examples of resources are property, stocks, bonds, and bank accounts. myRA savings might affect your eligibility for purposes of qualifying for state or federal assistance, including benefits paid under the Supplemental Security Income or SSI. Also, your Social Security disability (SSDI) income is considered “Unearned Income”. Generally, the more countable income you have, the less your SSI benefit will be. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 if you need further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. We hope this helps.

    • Hi James, please call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213, for assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day, or later in the week. Thanks!

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