Social Security Supports National Cancer Survivors Day

women hugging, wearing pinkIn 2017, more than a million people will be diagnosed with cancer around the world. This alarming statistic affects people and families everywhere. Chances are, you know someone who has been affected by this terrible disease.

On June 4, we observe National Cancer Survivors Day in the United States. In support of this day, Social Security encourages getting checkups to provide early detection, raise awareness through education, and recognize the survivors who have gone through this battle or are still living with the disease. Continue reading

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Celebrating Those Who Provide Care

elderly man and woman in the parkNovember was National Family Caregivers Month. In his Presidential Proclamation in celebration of caregivers, President Obama reminds us that our great nation was founded on the ideal that we all do better when we look out for one another. For millions of Americans, this concept is more than an ideal. It’s a day-to-day reality. Continue reading

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Keeping our Disability Programs Updated

elderly woman on computerAs we continue to reflect on the 60th anniversary of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) this year, it’s worth noting some of the ways the program has evolved over time. A lot has changed since DI started in 1956! We continuously work to ensure our programs keep pace with rapid changes in medical care, healthcare delivery models, assistive technology, and workplace requirements. Continue reading

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Social Security Disability Secures Today and Tomorrow

ssdi60“I have never asked for help, but man did I need it now.” This is the case for many people living with disabling conditions that prevent them from working. At Social Security, we see and hear these stories every day.

We provide benefits to millions of people with disabilities and their families through the Social Security Disability Insurance program. This earned benefit program provides a vital lifeline for those who can no longer work because of an oftentimes unexpected critical illness. Disability can be unpredictable and can change anyone’s life at any time. Continue reading

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Come See Their Faces, Learn the Facts

learn the facts ssaIn times of tragedy and uncertainty, Social Security is a constant for America, a lifeline. Our Faces and Facts of Disability website is at the heart of who we are as an agency. We share the stories about people living with disabling conditions and receiving benefits from Social Security. The site puts a face and name to people who truly benefit from our programs. Learning the facts and hearing peoples’ stories about disability allows for a better understanding of the Social Security program. Continue reading

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You Can Help Shape Our Disability Policy

person holding puzzle piece

Social Security needs your help. We are asking for responses to an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on how we should modernize our vocational rules, which we first published in 1978. These are the rules our disability decision makers use to decide whether an adult with a severe disabling condition can do any job in the national economy. Continue reading

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How I Navigated the Social Security Disability Process

FaFoD

I’m on Social Security disability insurance (SSDI). Okay I said it, and, I’m also very thankful for it. I might sound somewhat perplexed, because it’s all new to me and isn’t what I had expected to deal with in life. Yet, I am realistic and understand that “things happen” to all people.

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Supporting the Americans with Disabilities Act

Woman in wheelchair smiling using smartphoneSocial Security is committed to the principles and spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to improve the lives of our beneficiaries and our employees who have one or more disabilities.

You may not like to think about the possibility of becoming disabled. However, if sometime in the future you find that you’re unable to work because you have a disabling condition that’s expected to last at least one year or result in death, then the thought will become a reality that you need to address.

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