36 thoughts on “Women need to understand their Social Security benefit…but that’s not all!

  1. I’m getting my social security disability check will I get a retirement benefit check also.Yours Truly,Ms.L.Price

    • When they switched me over from disability payments to retirement at retirement age, it was the same exact amount … just the same check amount. They did, however, mess me up with my Medicare. For some reason, they changed my Medicare account, too, or, at least, that’s what they said happened. My bills were refused by Medicare for a month or two and had to be re-filed later. Just keep an eye out for what is happening.

      • same with me; you get a letter advising you are no longer received SSDI benefits.

        you are now of age for retirement … SAME $$.

    • at 65 your disability will switch over to social security. your check will not change, you will get the same amount.

  2. Look into maximum amounts social security allows per household. It only allows you to receive so much. I don’t know if it pertains to your situation but I got much less than my full disability amount once I began receiving other benefits.

  3. How come clerks not abreast of “offset’ for government retirees? Both NJ &FL cannot give me answers. My husband just passed, he had state pension and social security. I have government pension and social security with offset (I receive $84 social security after Part B paid. Will I now receive something from my husband? One woman said yes and no offset. Is this true? Husband passed Jan. 25, haven’t heard anything back from them.

    • Call the toll free number 1800-772 1213. This blog provides general information and does not give advice for individual situations.

    • Hi, Phyllis. A pension based on work that is not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies, such as police officers and some teachers) may cause the amount of your Social Security benefit to be reduced. Your benefit can be reduced based on one of two provisions: The Government Pension Offset and the Windfall Elimination Provision. To learn more, please visit our webpage, Information for Government Employees. For your security, we do not have access to information about your account. We do ask that members in our Blog community continue to work with our local offices with questions about their specific case. Thanks.

    • We are sorry to hear about your loss Phyllis. A pension based on work that is not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies) may cause the amount of your Social Security benefit to be reduced. Your benefits can be reduced based on one of two provisions. Your own Social Security benefit can be reduced based on the Windfall Elimination Provision. Your widow’s benefits under Social Security may be affected by the Government Pension Offset. You should receive an official notice soon. For follow up and further assistance, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives at our toll free number are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  4. Hi,
    I have not got any social security benefits niether from Florida State and nor from Taxas Workfoce Commission,it is really a misserable because life is not mooving without money.kindly do for me.
    sincerely you

    • Hi! If you are referring to a claim for Social Security benefits, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, for follow up and further assistance. Representatives at our toll free number are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  5. I am currently receiving SS Disability benefits and need to know if I am required to apply for regular SS benefits, and if so what age would I apply for and would my benefits change when I reach age 62 or 65? Or does this happen at a certain age without me applying. Also, will my benefits be reduced at that time? Thank you.

    • Hi, Carol. Thanks for your questions. Social Security disability benefits paid under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, automatically convert to retirement benefits when individuals attain their Full Retirement Age. Full retirement age (also called “normal retirement age”) had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959. Generally, the benefit amount remains the same when we convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits. Disability (SSDI) payments are established at the highest rate possible, based on your earnings record. We hope you find this helpful.

  6. Many people do not know how retirement from social security works, they need to educate themselves and take care of their own needs, we as women put the burden on other people shoulders because we are care givers and expect someone else to take care of our financial needs when we get older. Wake up!!! when it comes to money you are on your own.

    • Not true. I am a strong woman and I do not expect anyone else, especially the government, to take care of my financial needs. You can be a care giver and take care of yourself.

  7. WHEN YOU REACH 65 YOU WILL BE SWITCHED OVER TO SOCIAL SECURITY. YOU WILL NOT HAVE TO DO ANYTHING, YOUR BENEFITS WILL REMAIN THE SAME.

    • Social Security disability benefits paid under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, automatically convert to retirement benefits when individuals attain their Full Retirement Age. Full retirement age (also called “normal retirement age”) had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959. Generally, the benefit amount remains the same when we convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits. Disability (SSDI) payments are established at the highest rate possible, based on the individual’s earnings record.

  8. My question is why has social security notcher able release disability funds that were paid by employees and employers.? Once a worker becomes disabled they have a right to request their assistance as needed It should not be left up to states’ or politicians to decide if they should be able to do so.

  9. Are divorced women able to file a restricted application on their ex husbands social security at full retirement age and keep working until age 70 when they can switch to their own social security?

    • Hi Shirley, if you turn 62 before January 2, 2016, deemed filing rules will not apply if you file at full retirement age or later. This means that you may file for either your spouse’s (divorced spouse)benefit or your retirement benefit without being required or “deemed” to file for the other. In this case, you may also restrict your application to apply only for spouse’s (divorced spouse) benefits and delay filing for your own retirement in order to earn delayed retirement credits. However, if you turn age 62 on or after January 2, 2016, you are required or “deemed” to file for both your own retirement and for any benefits you are due as a spouse, no matter what age you are.

  10. The duties of social security administration officials and the importance of social security administration in should be taught tin high school so that both men and women know how they are affected by this great government organization.
    Also SSA should recruit and train people who can be relied upon in providing excellent service to the people. As a of now some SSA officials don’t understand the rules, consequently, they deprive citizens of their benefits. Just recently auditors discovered that beneficiaries were wrongly deprived of their entitlements by SSA officials. Even when you correct these officials, they hold tenacious to their wrong decisions without caring a hoot about your losses simply because they know that you are ignorant of their rules and operations.

  11. I AM TURNING 65 in july 03,2017,i am already receiving social security,will the amount of my check increase at that time?

  12. As a long term homemaker, now divorced– when my Disability benefit automatically became my SS benefit I was not given the option of claiming my husbands SS benefit. Is this something I needed to apply for?

    • Thank you for your question. Thanks for your question. Here are the requirements to receive benefits if you are divorced:
      • You are unmarried;
      • You are age 62 or older;
      • You were married to your ex-spouse for at least 10 years;
      • Your ex-spouse is entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits and,
      • The benefit you are entitled to receive based on your own work is less than the benefit you would receive based on your ex-spouse’s work. This means that if you are eligible for retirement benefits on your own record, we will pay that amount first. If the benefit on your spouse’s record is higher, you will get an additional amount on that record so that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount. For more information, check out our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced webpage.

      We recommend that you read our publication, “What Every Woman Should Know” for more important information. Thanks!

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